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Unrest in Thailand; Corruption Crackdown in China; Mong Kok Pedestrian Zone (29 Nov 2013)

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Protests are still continuing in Thailand, with demonstrators this morning protesting in six different sites. There have been similar scenes in Bangkok over the years, and some have even involved military intervention, but is it likely to go so far this time? With us in the studio is Professor Mark Thompson from the South East Asia Research Centre of the City University of Hong Kong. At the Third Plenum of the People’s Republic of China, the message seemed clear. This government is going to get tough on corruption. And now there’s news that a senior official in charge of handling petitions is being investigated by the Communist Party. The detention of Xu Jie, who is deputy chief of the State Bureau for Letters and Calls, is the latest corruption investigation announced since that third plenum, and his bureau has been labelled one of the worst breeding grounds for graft. But are the recent cases a sign of a genuine crackdown. How determined is the government to go after corruption root and branch? With us in the studio is Dr Zhu Jiangnan of the University of Hong Kong’s Department of Politics and Public Administration. The Mong Kok Pedestrian Precinct was introduced in the year 2000. It has become popular with street performers, tourists, social activists and even telecommunication services providers. But the residents have been complaining that all these pedestrian uses are making the street too noisy. Last Thursday, 24 Yau Tsim Mong District Councilors unanimously voted to reduce the opening hours of the Precinct to Saturdays, Sundays and public holidays only. The rest of the time they want it open to vehicles.

Program: 
The Pulse
Publish Date: 
Friday, November 29, 2013
Station: 
RTHK
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